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« Interesting poll on who does, and does not, support breed-specific laws | Main | Kia, dog found in KCMO Tow Lot, makes national TV debut »

May 15, 2013

Comments

Selma

My question is much more simple than that: Where is the evidence that DNA testing works in MIXED BREED dogs?

Hint: To date, there is none [that I can find, still looking, always looking].

There is some accuracy in purebreds but testing has been very limited.

BorderWars

I have yet to see any of these Dog DNA tests actually TESTED themselves against known dogs of known heritage. They can't be used (and they state this themselves) to identify purebreds. Why would this be?

An derivative study like this would be interesting if the actual DNA tests were anywhere near accurate. But so far I see no evidence that they provide ANY insight. And I'm a big fan of DNA and dogs.

I think they are, at this point, just a scam. So this entire analysis, rather premature and indicative of nothing.

You can't really cross-examine visual identification methods if the DNA test itself hasn't been proven accurate.

Brent

BW -- I think it's important to note that the accuracy of the DNA test itself is not important to support the overall conclusion. The conclusion is that visual identification is not accurate --- and can be derived at through the reality that visual identification varies greatly from person to person. So we know, beyond a shadow of a doubt that visual ID of mixed breed dogs is very much in the eye of the identifier. I think DNA testing has a lot of promise to change this in the future. I think that in it's current form is is more reliable than a "scam". But the conclusion that visual ID is not reliable is found true in this case whether the DNA is accurate or not.

melliroth

I certainly like animals, especially dogs. They are cute.
Here is a link https://www.khanacademy.org/

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