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« Scale | Main | Top 5+1 for September/October 2012 »

November 01, 2012

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db

I'd be interested to know what communities like Memphis, TN do. It's clear that the administration of that city is no more interested in saving animals' lives than flying to the moon (well, maybe a trip to the moon might help the animals ...). He staffs his city with people who, for the most part, share the same disregard for animals' lives. I'm sure that there are other places where the government (for whatever reason) is just not interested and, in many cases, makes it very difficult for anyone to help/save the animals. How do we make a difference? I'm also thinking about places like Detroit (near where I live) where Michigan Humane PR gives the impression that they don't kill any "adoptable" animals (but in reality have a kill rate much, much higher than the national average). How do we move forward when those in power refuse to consider another alternative?

Brent

I think the best solution for situations like this is to try to do two things:

1) Try to get the city/management of the Michigan humane (or other) to see the need to work to save lives and to change the management if necessary in order to do so.

2) While you are working on this, start building a rescue/foster network so you can pull animals out of the shelter and save their lives. The more lives you save, and the more credit you get for doing it, helps change minds, and also shows that you are one willing to roll up your sleeves and HELP save lives vs just criticizing them for not doing it.

This is the approach Austin Pets Alive used to get around a poor shelter manager that was saving only about 50% of the animals that came into the shelter -- and through their aggressive foster/adoption program they were able to get the shelter up to nearly no kill status even before they changed the shelter management. It took them many years to do it, but by the time they got the management changed they already had the built in foster network created so they were in a great spot to succeed.

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