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« Chippewa County, MI sees no kill success | Main | Aurora repeals ban on 7 breeds, keeps it for 3 »

April 11, 2011

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Eilleen

Very interesting article on how we actually domesticate an animal versus "tame" an animal. Big Big difference. We have truly domesticated very few animals. These are the ones we work with every day. But have you ever seen a domesticated zebra - it won't happen they do not have the genes for it. Facinating reading if anyone is interested in evolutionary biology.

KateH

And while there are some who feel they must have a 'different' kind of pet to make themselves seem special, I really hope they find out what fox pee smells like - even outside. Yes, they're cute as hell, but the smell is not.

Jennifer Brighton

When people argue how pit bulls are born to fight and kill, I often reference this Science Daily study titled "Dogs are Aggressive if Trained Badly"

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090424114315.htm

Some excerpts from the article:

"...contrary to popular belief, breed has little to do with a dog's aggressive behaviour compared to all the owner-dependant factors."

"Breed has less influence on aggressiveness"

"The Spanish researchers studied 711 dogs (354 males and 357 females) of which 594 were purebred and 117 were half-breed dogs older than one year of age. Among the breeds observed were the Bull Terrier, the American Pit Bull Terrier, the Alsatian, the Boxer, the Rottweiler, the Doberman, as well as apparently more docile breeds such as the Dalmatian, the Irish Setter, the Golden Retriever, the Labrador Retriever, the Miniature Poodle, the Chihuahua, the Pekinese, or the French Bulldog, which also exhibit dominant behaviour."

"According to the researcher, "dogs that are trained properly do not normally retain aggressive dominance behaviour". PĂ©rez-Guisado attributes this "exceptional" conduct to the existence of some medical or organic problem, "which can cause changes in the dog's behaviour"."

Of course, the people who rely on newspapers as their main source of information won't buy into a scientific study, especially when it proves them wrong.

kmk

This reminds me a bit of the study on selective breeding of Arctic Foxes in an effort to make the nasty creatures esier to manage by the fur farmers. This was a study that came out of the old Soviet Union and became public when the Soviet Union fell apart. It's equally interesting. I used to listen to people talk about the differences in temperament based on color and coat type in different breeds and I dismissed it as craziness - until I read that study.

Eilleen makes a good point about "domestication". "Domestic house cat" is an oxymoron. They're only domesticated because of their small size. If they were the size of a tiger they would kill and eat their owners, LOL.

I think "managed" is a better term than "domesticated" for some animals.

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